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Lemon-Orange Chiffon Cake Recipe

If you’re looking for the perfect dessert to bring to your ladies luncheon, our beloved Lemon-Orange Chiffon Cake is the way to go. It’s just as tasty as it is beautiful, and the vibrant dessert is sure to impress even the most elevated of cake connoisseurs. Complete with both orange zest and orange juice, this chiffon cake is bursting with fresh flavor.Because of the egg white mixture, this dessert is fluffier than most, which makes it the ideal choice for a summer occasion. The last thing folks want when the temperature is rising is a dense and heavy cake. Serve the Lemon-Orange Chiffon Cake for a universal thumbs up. What makes it so lovely? It’s the candied fruit garnish. Topping off this sweet treat with a delicate embellishment gorgeously completes the dish. This quintessentially Southern and citrusy cake needs to be at the center of the table during you next celebration.

Hands-On Time time: 30 minutes
Total Time time: 2 hours 10 minutes
Yields: 12 servings

Ingredients

2 1/2 cups cake flour, sifted

1 1/3 cups sugar

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup vegetable oil

5 large eggs, separated

3/4 cup fresh orange juice

3 tablespoons orange zest

1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar

Lemon-Orange Buttercream Frosting

Garnishes: candied oranges and lemons, edible flowers, kumquat slices

How to Make It

Preheat oven to 350°. Combine first 4 ingredients in bowl of a heavy-duty electric stand mixer. Make a well in center of flour mixture; add oil, egg yolks, and orange juice. Beat at medium-high speed 3 to 4 minutes or until smooth. Stir in zest.

Beat egg whites and cream of tartar at medium-high speed until stiff peaks form. Gently fold into flour mixture. Spoon batter into 3 greased and floured 9-inch round cake pans.

Bake at 350° for 17 to 20 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pans on wire racks 10 minutes; remove from pans to wire racks, and cool completely (about 1 hour).

Spread Lemon-Orange Buttercream Frosting between layers and on top and sides of cake.

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