Subscribe

How To Cook Field Peas

Butter beans, crowders, and lady peas are some of the field peas you'll find at your local farmer's market. - Photo: Beth Dreiling Hontzas
Butter beans, crowders, and lady peas are some of the field peas you'll find at your local farmer's market. Photo: Beth Dreiling Hontzas

Welcome back to The Farm Stand, your weekly guide to seasonal Southern produce.

In the Southern Hall of Fame, field peas fit right in with the likes of Dolly Parton, pimiento cheese, and Spanish moss. Once considered a plentiful, drought-resistant staple for those with little else to eat, they've been boiling alongside fatback and onions since colonial times. Now, you're just as likely to find them in acclaimed restaurants like Charleston's Husk as you are in old-school soul food joints like Mama Dean's in Fayetteville.

WATCH: How to Cook Fresh Peas

More from Southern Living

They come in just as many forms and names as there are ways to eat them: zipper, crowder, Sadandy, whippoorwill, purple hull, zipper, lady, turkey craw, and Mississippi Silver. When I would buy pink-eyed peas from one of my favorite vendors at the Forysth Farmers Market in Savannah, he would tell me he missed his swing at them and that's why they weren't black-eyed.

So whether you're a super fan or just starting out, here are some tips and recipes for making the most out this pea season's end.

Pea Points

Recipes to Make With Field Peas

Don't fuss finding the specific field pea or butter bean a recipe calls for. Most can be substituted for one another. Try these field pea recipes below and let us know what your favorite variety is.

Outbrain

More from Southern Living