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Yes, You Can Grow Cosmos in a Container

- Laurey W. Glenn
Laurey W. Glenn

Take a cue from Mother Nature with this loosely planted display of cosmos.

Even if you aren’t fortunate enough to live next to a meadow of wildflowers, you can still capture their untamed beauty in a container this summer. Cheerful pink cosmos steal the show in this arrangement, accented by globe amaranths and pincushion flowers, all atop a lush bed of vibrant green sheet moss. (Check your local garden shop for the sheet moss.) Cosmos come in a range of colors, from burgundy to pink to white. Mix them up for a more natural look, like a wildflower meadow. Bonus: this colorful flower, native to tropical America, is known to attract birds and butterflies with their cheery blooms.

Want to bring their beauty indoors? Snip flowers right after they bloom and place them in cool, deep water for a long-lasting bouquet. Cosmos are prime for not only containers, but for creating a mass of color in borders or backgrounds, or as a filler among shrubs.

How To

Start by planting the flowers, and then cover the soil with the moss, which will lock in moisture for the roots as summer’s heat approaches. Place in full sun, and water moderately.

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Get the Look

Double this arrangement’s rustic appeal with a vintage-inspired container, like this lightweight fiber-cement planter that will stand up to the elements. Try these resources for a similar look:

Fiber Concrete Barrel Pot
This pot feels vintage and rustic, like an old dolly tub, but has none of the rusting potential. Available in several colors.
From $20; shopterrain.com

Oakland Concrete Planter
This one comes in a convenient extra-large size, so it’s perfect if you’re needing a rather tall planter for a porch, doorway, or garden accent.
$259.95; williams-sonoma.com

Concrete Fluted Planters
Play with scale, and pair these short and squatty planters with the tall and narrow version for the perfect contrast.
From $104; potterybarn.com

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